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Sytle & Information - Womens one-piece swimsuit - Styles / Designs

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Index

 

> High-leg line one-piece swimsuit
> One-piece swimsuit Cutout
> The Miokini (Different to a monokini)
> One-piece swimsuit Tanga
> One-piece swimsuit Rolldown
> Suspender one-piece swimsuit
> T-front one-piece swimsuit
> Pretzel & Slingshot one-piece swimsuit
> One-piece swimsuit Torpedo
> One-piece swimsuit Sarong
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BLK1.com Model - Paloma wearing hi-leg one piece swimsuitBLK1.com Model - Paloma wearing hi-leg one piece swimsuit

HIGH-LEG LINE ONE-PIECE SWIMSUIT (Hi-LEG LINE MAILLOT SWIMSUIT)

Overview
The one-piece swimsuit hi-legline is defined as having the leg-line above the waistline when worn. The hi-leg one-piece swimsuit is destinguished by the increased skin showing around a womens top leg area, hips and in extreme hi-leg swimsuits around the outer waist area. The high leg line one-piece swimsuit debute in the early 1980s during the retro 1980s era with the popularity of retro hi-leg leotards worn by women during aerobics. The rising legline synergizes the one-piece swimsuit developments because the solid torso construction of the one-piece swimsuit and the uplift provided by shoulder straps permiting the legline to rise much higher than with the v-kini swimsuit. During the initial part of this rise, all construction within the one-piece swimsuit was sacrificed, as stretchy thin spandex become the dominant material. Elastic straps wrap over the shoulders, revitalizing the tank silhouette and deepening cleavage. String halter influences are also very evident with hi-leg one-piece swimwear. Strapless styles do exist, but are unable to sustain the rising momentum because at some point they lack the neck/shoulder uplift to keep the legline rising. An example of a hi-leg one-piece swimsuit provided by BLk1.com - Swimsuit picture 1.0 above. These styles are still available today and are becoming more fashionable in todays society. Many countries/area such as Japan, Europe and the USA are traditional countries were high-leg one-piece swimwear can be seen at pools, beaches and swimming/diving competitions.

As the legline continues to rise it eventually collides with the armhole. Many of these extremely hi-leg line swimsuits are very rarely seen in public beaches and are many sold as erotic lingerie style pieces.


Hi-Leg line in Hi-fashion
The continual appearance of the hi-leg line one-piece swimsuit has been seen through all the decades and continues to be seen in many hi-fashion international catwalks parades today. One of the oldest swimsuit brands 'Gottex' which has been making swimsuits for over 50 years regularly incorporates hi-leg one-piece swimsuit in many of their swimwear ranges. Other popular hi-fashion brands include "Lenny" swimwear (Brasil Brand) and major brands such as Versace, D Squared, D & G, continue to use the hi-leg line one-piece swimsuit design in their latest swimwear lines. The hi-leg line one-piece swimsuit is making a come back in fashion.

Hi-Leg line in competition swimwear
Many countries have different trends when it comes to hi-leg line competition one-piece swimwear. There has been a common trend for competition swimmers to wear knee or full body swimsuits for decrease in drag reasons. However the downside is the reduction in leg movement when it comes to swimming events such as Breaststroke. You will tend to find some olympic swimmers will wear a hi-leg line swimsuit specifically for breaststroke events. There are urguments against full body swimsuits as it increases a swimmers body surface and therefor creating more drag on a swimmers body. The most popular countries which still support a hi-leg line one-piece swimsuit for olympic swimming events are the Chinese and Japanese. Many of their countries main competition swimsuit brands such as; Speedo, ASICS and Arena specifically design hi-leg swimsuits for their countries standard retail market and olympic swimmers. In Japan, retail consumers can have Brands such as Speedo tailered made to fit with a high leg line option from most Speedo outlets.

Fashion Tip for Hi-leg line competition swimsuits - If you want to add a little fashion flair or sex appeal to a competition swimsuit then consider a hi-leg line competition one-piece swimsuit. Some tips are:

- Black in colour is always appearling and can emphasis other parts of your body. Also black can be appealing for an untanned body (completely white can make a great contrast on a women body inparticular if you have small breasts. Can show off you other assets).
- Consider buying a shinny material or a competition swimsuit material such as Aquablade. The more shiny, the more appealing you can look.
- Consider a one-coloured swimsuit to emphasis your body then a multicoloured swimsuit.
- The more hi-leg line showing, then more appealing.

Hi-Leg line in TV/Movies
The appearance of the hi-leg line one-piece swimsuit in TV and Movies has been used extensively to make women look more appealing in a scene. Whilst still covering a womens breast and bottoms, a hi-leg swimsuit emphasis a womens hips and legs leaving much to a persons imagination. Hi-leg line one-piece swimsuits were commonly shown in many TV/Movies in the 1980s when the aerobics leotard trend was strong. The most popular International TV show that showed many hi-leg line one-piece swimsuits was the TV show 'Baywatch.'


Wearing Hi-Leg line swimwear


General
A hi-leg line one-piece swimsuit worn on a female of all ages can make a women look very appealing. A women who has:

- Small breast
- Large thick legs
- Short legs but large torso
- Athletic body
- Very slim body
- Flat Stomach

should consider wearing a hi-leg one-piece swimsuit. The great opportunity for a women to wear a hi-leg line one-piece swimsuit is when they may have some bad point about their body or they lack self confidence about their looks. If a women doesn't have large breasts, then they should consider wearing something that makes another part of their body more appealing, e.g. legs, slim body, flat stomach. A high-leg line one-piece swimsuit on a women is just as appealing if not more attractive then a women in a bikini with large breasts. Another point about hi-leg line swimsuits is that if a women wishes to make a statement or have an original look when around a group of women/men, then a hi-leg line one piece swimsuit can give you that instant trendy status.

Colours - If you wish to emphasis your legs or hips, then you should consider only wearing a one-coloured hi-leg line one-piece swimsuit. For a hi-fashion, very sexy appearance, a completely black hi-leg line one-piece swimsuit (even a shiny material) swimsuit is recommended. A black colour contrasted against a very white body can look extremely appealing (don't believe a tanned body is better). Once again it comes down to contrasts. Pure black swimsuit on a light white skin person can be extremely effective. For women with dark skin, you can still wear black for effect but also consider pure white colour aswell. If you are purchasing a hi-leg lineThe darker the skin the whiter the swimsuit you should consider. A multi coloured hi-leg line swimsuit comes down to personal taste.

Cut - A hi-leg line one-piece swimsuit can be appealing, but a too high leg line for a swimming/fashion reason can make a woman look like she is in lingerie (cut that goes above bottom rib line). The best way to know you have the right cut is when the swimsuit sits just on top of your hips and follows the natural body contors from your hips to your pubic area (the line between the top of your legs and your stomach). If you are not use to wearing hi-leg line swimwear. then try a pair of hi-leg line swimwear on and let the swimmer naturally cover your body without any adjustment, then pull the swimsuit sides over your hips and let it rest on your hips. View yourself in the mirror to see the effect it has on your body (see what areas it does emphasis). You may discover some hidden beauty about your body you never knew existed (your hips,long legs or stomach). Some hi-leg line swimsuits may also be g-string design at the back. This cut is ideal for women with a nicely shapped bottom. A standard design covering a womens complete bottom is ideal for women with a slighly large bottom (reduces the emphasis to you bottom if covered)

Getting rid of bikini tan lines - A hi-leg line one-piece swimsuit can remove those deep bikini tan marks from your body. By alternatively wearing a hi-leg swimsuit and a bikini in the sun can make your bikini line around your hips disappear. Great point for the fashion follower or for professional models.

Points to note:- Make sure you have a bikini wax (or shave) that accomodiates the hi-leg line cut. Try to wax/shave 3 days before you wear your swimsuit to avoid any wax/shaving marks.
Be aware that you may become more flattering to men.




 

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One-piece swimsuit Cutout (Maillot Cutout)

 

One-piece Swimsuit Cutout Defined
A one-piece swimsuit with holes cut out in them is called a one-piece swimsuit cutouts (maillot cutouts) and are a recurrent swimsuit theme throughout the history of the one-piece swimsuit.

The Cutout Invention
Cutouts are first manifest in the early 1930s, initially exposing the sides of the midriff. One-piece cut outs were first seen on the mide 1930s with its various types and styles of one-piece cut outs seen in todays society. In the 1960s the cutout is reinvented as swimsuit designers grapple with alternatives to bikini minimization. Cutouts provide a way to transfer some of the very brief bikini exposures back to the one piece. But a return to foundations is not a part of this rediscovery, and the sixties cutout is stretchy and prone to overexposure. In the early 1980s, after the rising legline and descending armhole collide side-tensioning is discovered and plays an important role in the one-piece swimsuit high legline. One-piece swimsuit cutout is a natural benefactor of these new dynamics and makes still another reemergence. The 1980s cutouts fit the body more tightly, and the progressively larger, often asymmetrical holes make classification uncertain. Some designers elect to punch out multiple holes, others slit the belly. The 1980s cutout tends to follow tension lines and bikini cuts. Belly opens up, and the lower waistlines leave the navel exposed, quite unlike the 1935 McCardle designs, where the waistline remained high.
Cutouts in the 1990s often appear in strange places and in the 1990s it is natural for one-piece swimsuit cutout to fuse with maillot tanga in many possible variations Another 1990s tendency is to employ multiple colors of fabric to create maillots which elude some of their coverage.


TYPES OF ONE-PIECE SWIMSUIT CUTOUTS

Front and Back Cutouts
On the most common a one-piece swimsuit cutout is were the cutout is either at the front of the one-piece swimsuit or at the back (or a combination of both). The cutouts can range in many different shapes and sizes.


Side cutouts
A side cutout one-piece swimsuit is were the sides of a one-piece swimsuit below the arms is cutout. The cutout style can range in many different shapes and sizes. Side cutout swimsuits can also be cut out at the front or back. Side cutouts should not be mistaken for the Monokini which is a bikini style cut with a small bar piece of material joining the top and bottom together.

Asymmetrical Cutouts
Asymmetrical cutouts is wear there many be a cutout holes, which are cutout completely around the body with a small piece of connecting fabric at one side. This style may expose navel, back, buttocks, or cleavage. Asymmetrical one-piece swimsuit cutouts may be open on either the left or right. The amount of the cutout can vary from a small hole on the side of the body to a swimsuit from which the middle has been cut almost completely around the body or which curves around the body.

Necklines and Leglines
In general the cutout need not limited by the overall silhouette of the maillot, although tanks, halter ties (RP8811), and strapless (FI8321, RP8507, JE8904, NYT198410, fig. 30-5) necklines each affect the cutout in unique ways. For example, compare two asymmetrical sideways v-kinis shown here in strapless and halter ties (fig. 30-7).
   Leglines can range from the straight leg of the 1950s to the v-leg of the 1980s or tanga (AB199343).

Many Cutouts
Multiple holes are another cutout alternative, with the holes either in the front or side or both. Three holes in the front demarcate the lower pelvis, ribs, and cleavage. The smaller the holes the more of them there can be, but this process can reach an extreme. One could argue that the extreme case of multiple holes is the fishnet, but it is generally agreed that fishnet one-piece swimsuits, despite their many small holes, do not constitute the cutout species. The difference is that fishnet is a weave, a fabric, and not a hole cut from the fabric. This difference between the hole being woven into the fabric vs. being cutout from the swimsuit convey different information to the voyeur.

The difference between cutouts and other one-piece swimsuit styles
The exact definition of just what constitutes a one-piece swimsuit cutout could be debated. The pretzel one-piece swimsuit appears at first glance to be a one-piece swimsuit cutout, but a more due to its use of tensioned fabric, and not the result of fabric that has been cut out of the garment. Likewise the one-piece swimsuit sarong(the wrap), and the various cross-tensioned miokini silhouettes (including the sidering and x-side) are subject to interpretation, but they too are classified as different styles. They, like one-piece swimsuits which include fasteners between a soutien-gorge and culotte share an origin as deux-pièces joined together rather than a one-piece swimsuit with fabric excised. Cutouts should not be confused with the suspender one-piece swimsuit which is actually comprised of a suspender culotte and a top, the T-front or with the x-back.
  

 

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The Miokini (Different to a monokini)

The Miokini Concept

Overview
In the late 1980s, the legline-meets-armhole one-piece swimsuit high-legline mutates into a new one-piece swimsuit style which bares the belly, yet remains connected at the sides by siderings, sideties, or criss-crossing X-sided fabric. Swimsuits of this style are called miokinis (short for maillotkinis) because the term suggests both their one-piece swimsuit (maillot) nature, or "mioness," as well as their bikini nature, or "kininess." Miokinis are not bi-kinis, but they are kinis in spirit. A miokini should not be confused with a monokini, which is the lower half a bikini, a culotte worn topless. Nor should it be confused with a number of different bikini and one-piece swimsuits which involve ambiguity between one and two pieces. These include theslide-side halter with ties pulled through the v-kini brief, the suspender one-piece swimsuit (especially when worn with a soutien-gorge), the one-piece cutout and the pretzel. The key identifying characteristic of miokini involves vertical tension: a top and bottom gathered into a single system of suspension that pulls the legline up and keeps the top down. The critical distinction is that miokini has the latent concept of two-piece coupled with vertical tension, whereas the maillot cutout does not.

Precursors
One of several ways to engage this connection is with rings at the midriff which connect the tops and bottoms, a practice which dates from the 1960s, and parallels the evolution of the sidering culotte. Historically the ring connection may be made at the belly center or at the sides. One may also classify the early 1980s side-joined bikinis as miokini, for example, tank tops coupled together to higher waistline v-kinis. This look is popular in athletic exercise-wear, with a tankini combined with a high legline, high waistline montante a showing a touch of bare belly-button. Like everything else of the era, they are absolutely devoid of lining. But these early experiments are a far cry from the full formed species.

The Mature Side-ring Miokini
The difference in the late 1980s is the influence of the very high legline; rings become a natural joining element as the rising legline collides with the lowering armhole. Thus the side-ring miokini, and its two points of connection that enable the entire side to be bare. The possibilities opened up by these new tension points are enormous because they involve rotating the design axes of the swimsuit 90 degrees from left-right to front-back. The side rings can animate from under the armpit down to the hip providing a dynamic control of back, hip, pubis, and chest exposure. They further enable a very high legline, V-cleavage, a bare back, and cleavage on the side of the breasts.

Unexpected Tensionings
Much of the mystery and eroticism of these sleek adornments is a fusion of novel tensionings and new combinations of exposure. The side tension point of the miokini for example, the seat of the ring offers unique front-back symmetrical tensioning possibilities and dramatically different exposures. Very high leglines are de rigeur, the sides of the breasts come into play, and the stomach scoops deeply to the pubic hair, and focuses attention on lower belly, echoing the silhouette of the v-kini. The waist tension point can create unusual breast coverings and a variety of top styles all flourish. The strapless is extremely risky and rare but shoulder straps proliferate, as do halter tops, tankini and some bizarre new configurations.


 

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One-piece swimsuit Tanga (Maillot Tanga)

 

Overview
A one-piece swimsuit tanga called a maillot tanga and tanga maillot are equivalent terms because both express the whole in terms of the other: a maillot tanga is a one-piece swimsuit that leaves the buttocks exposed (Commonly known as a g-string one-piece swimsuit). Many of the one-piece swimsuit styles can also have a Tanga style.



 

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One-piece swimsuit Rolldown (Maillot Rolldown)

 

Overview
The one-piece swimsuit rolldown (maillot rolldown), also called a maillot de roulè, is a one-piece which can be rolled down to the waist, so as to bare the breasts and render its wearer topless. It comes in all strap variations, but shoulder straps and strapless configurations provide the easiest vector of doff and don. The term de roulè is also used as a modifier to indicate the state of a maillot as, "she suntanned by the pool de roulè." The rolldown emerged in the late 1980s and is catalyized by the advancement of the topless bikini, and by the related rolldown culotte, which, whether worn topless or not, also invites self-adjustment.


Evolution
One-piece swimsuit rolldowns advantage is a single garment which transitions easily between the requirements of the pool and those of the street. Maillot rolldown is often strapless, but shoulder straps are common as well. It is almost almost made of thin fabric so it can easily be rolled down to the waist, even below the navel and the top of the hips. Thin flexible fabric also allows the legline to be simultaneously raised. Strapped as well as strapless variations are found both full-bottomed or tangaed. Maillot de roulè is sometimes combined with a narrow tube bandeau which can be worn as a belt around the waist or hips (playing with the layered look) and which, once the one-piece is rolled down, may be lifted to cover the breasts, should the unfortunate situation rise where coverage is needed. Conversly, in skilled hands the belted rolldown can be manipulated so that the bikiniite is never topless, although her belly can be made quite exposed. Because the one-piece rolldown provides coverage flexibility it is a popular costume at topless beaches where the venue of toplessness is always a factor.  

 

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Suspender One-piece swimsuit (Suspender Maillot)

 

Overview
A suspender one-piece swimsuit is essentially a suspender culotte, that is, a culotte with suspender straps over the shoulders. Unless it is worn very carefully, or with a soutien-gorge (or T-shirt), it is safe to assume that a suspender is prone to be barebreasted. The suspender is similar to the torpedo swimsuit with the difference that the torpedo lacks a waistband. Nor is the suspender a one-piece swimsuit cutout even when worn with a top so that the result is similar exposures.




 

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T-front One-piece swimsuit (T-front Maillot)

 

Overview
The T-front one-piece swimsuit could be argued to be a bikini however because the bottoms have a strap up the body between the breasts, and around the neck, this defines it as a one-piece swimsuit. This shape of the suit gives it its name. The bikini advocates argue that because the suit consists of two pieces it is indeed a bikini. The one-piece swimsuit advocates argue that a top is optional, and when worn is an accessory to the one-piece swimsuit, not the other way around.
  
The T-front one-piece swimsuit is a post-bikini, late 20th century silhouette which made its first appearances in the late 1970s. Besides the strong centerline focus, the defining characteristics may include a high waistline and bulk, and it is most often seen combined with a strapped bra or bandeau halter ties only confuse the silhouette. Easily worn with no top at all, it shares a fashion spirit with the more traditional topless one-piece swimsuit either with shoulder straps or strapless and without them. Given the constraints of the silhouette it is easy to raise or lower the waistline, especially in the back where the center lift on the front makes rugage practical. In practice the belly button is almost always covered. Legline can be conservative or rise inside inguinal and the buttocks can be covered or bared, tanga style.

 

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Pretzel & Slingshot One-piece swimsuit (Pretzel & Slingshot Maillot)

 

Overview
The pretzel maillot takes its name from its shape: in pure form the top is twisted before being put over the head so, like its namesake, it provides a criss-cross motif with bareness below. It is sometimes also called a "twister."  The pretzel emerges in the early 1990s, a product of Spandex and a desire to discover new fashion lines. Like the criss cross halter the pretzel uses cross-tensioning to somewhat unconvincingly capture but hardly support the breasts, before racing down to the side to anchor the waistline at the side or back and to provide corresponding uplift for the bottom. The pretzel is almost always completely bare-backed and tanga, if only because the uplift from the criss-cross will force the legline upward and inward, so that the bikiniite will reveal buttage (and inquinal) whether she intends to or not. The diagonal line below the breasts, coupled with the rising, v-kini silhouette of the front, produce a diamond of bare belly that can strike deep yet also reveal cleavage centros, underside, as well as côté.      

Pretzel necklines are usually designed without fasteners, and although neckties do exist and can provide some adjustment they can also be annoying to wear. Most pretzels can also be worn without the twist that is, the bikiniite simply dons the maillot with the strap behind the neck without criss-crossing it in front. A maillot worn this way, or which is specifically cut to be worn in this matter is usually called a slingshot maillot; the fact that the pretzel and slingshot styles are often interchangeable is the reason they are both discussed here. The slingshot silhouette combines aspect of the deep V plunge maillot, with the not-entirely subtle distinction of that the breast cups are quite narrow and independently adjust on the waistline, pulling it quite high. Depending upon the cut of the pretzel, wearing it slingshot style can be quite flattering or it can work against the natural mechanics of the swimsuit. It goes without saying that one reason the slingshot has more appeal in the realm of glamour than the real world is its propensity to breast exposure.

Pretzels and slingshot are sometimes made with fuller fabric but more frequently are string bikini styles. In both the slingshot and its twisted sister, the bottom of the bra cups often terminate in slide casings on the string waistline.In topological terms note that the haltered pretzel has five edges whereas the more rare (and more secure) X-back variation has six. The slingshot, always haltered, has four edges. This topological analysis helps separate the slingshot from the suspender maillot, with its two shoulder straps and five edges, and from the always sideless torpedo also with two shoulder straps but only three edges.

 

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One-piece swimsuit Torpedo (Torpedo Maillot)

 

Overview
A torpedo is a one-piece swimsuit with no sides or waistband. It's most typical manifestation a very deep V-front that may be bare naveled, with narrow sides, a tangaed behind, and straps that might wide enough to cover the breast or nothing more than strings. It basic modus is brevity, and it excels at displaying cleavage, buttage, and the inguinal. A torpedo is essentially a loop of fabric that passés through the crotch, up the back where it parts for the neck, crosses the shoulders, and down the front again over the breasts. In its fuller incarnations the straps of the torpedo can cover the breasts although this can be a very unstable coverage, and one which almost always involves cleavage centros and côté, if not full breast exposures. Like the slingshot, the torpedo is an early 1990s creation. Both involve a very high legline, narrow vertical coverage of the breast, exposed inguinals, and are frequently tangaed. One difference is that the slingshot incorporates a (disguises) waistband and is typically haltered, whereas the torpedo must involve straps.

In topological terms, a torpedo has three edges: Two leglines and one neckline. This is contrasted with the four edges of the slingshot and the five edges of the pretzel. The torpedo is also related to the suspender mailott, but again the definitive distinction lies in the number of edges: the suspender maillot has five. Both maillots have shoulder straps and may be topless; the difference is that the suspender has a connected waist; the torpedo does not. It may be argued that the torpedo is not a one-piece swimsuit at all but a form of strapped culotte sort of a sideless with straps or a strapped g-string. Even more so than the strapped one-piece swimsuit the straps are an essential part of the torpedo--even if it is worn with a top.

Torpedo Twists
Both the suspender and torpedo can be worn with the straps twisted into different configurations. These rich variations are most simply illustrated with the string torpedo: where the straps may be worn normally or over the alternate shoulder. They may be twisted and worn over the corresponding or opposite shoulder. Twisting them twice produces many variations.

 

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One-piece swimsuit Sarong (Maillot Sarong)

Overview
During the minimisation of bikini in the late 1970s and into the early 1980s, sarong style, "wrap maillots" become one of the few one-piece alternatives to the string. The wrap resonates the theme of ties and strings, and catches some of bikiniÕs spirit of stretch. The late 1970s wrap maillot evokes a number of variations but in a formal, fastening sense, the modern, pure maillot sarong silhouette is usually fastened behind the neck via a fastener or tie and then stretches downward across the body, through the crotch and up the hips before wrapping around the waist to tie in the front center. The silhouette is a lesson in physicals and exposures: the uplift of the halter balances the downward pull and this in turns enables a plunging neckline, bare sides and a very high legline. Strapless designs also appear with blends of hi-leg line.

 

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